jannavmiller@gmail.com'

About Janna Miller & Chris Brownson

Janna Miller was a 2007 corps member in the Mississippi Delta region. She taught 4th grade during her two years in the corps and then stayed in Mississippi a third year and taught 5th grade ELA. Before joining Teach For America, she majored in psychology. After teaching, she joined the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Chris Brownson is a former corps member (LA '93) and a licensed psychologist. After his two years teaching, he promptly returned to his alma mater, the University of Texas at Austin, to pursue graduate work in counseling psychology. He received my Ph.D. in 2001 and is now a licensed psychologist in the State of Texas, the director of the University of Texas Counseling & Mental Health Center, and the National Mental Health Consultant for TFA.

Three Questions to Ask Yourself at the End of the School Year

Three Questions to Ask Yourself at the End of the School Year

It can sometimes be tempting, as the school year wraps up, to simply push through, finish your remaining tasks, and head into summer. We can all relate to counting down the days—but it’s important to take a little time to reflect as the year ends. Endings are a good time to assess how an experience has gone for you, so that you can synthesize the many things you’ve learned, gain closure, and set goals for the future. Below are a few questions you might consider as you wind down the school year.

How to Boost Your Mental Health and Well-Being This Summer

red outdoor sun umbrellas

With just a few weeks left in the school year, and summer plans in the works, we thought it was a great time to revisit some advice from TeacherPop’s mental health expert, Janna Miller. See how she recommends boosting your mental well-being during the next few months.

How to Practice Mindfulness in Your Life

How to Practice Mindfulness in Your LifeThis is the third in a series of three posts devoted to the topic of mindfulness. Read parts I and II here.

As we’ve discussed in the previous two posts, mindfulness is purposefully paying attention to the present moment in a non-judgmental way. Essentially, it is a skill to train your mind to focus on the present moment, rather than fixating on the past or the future. Mindfulness helps you build awareness about your thoughts, feelings, and emotions, a process that generates mental and physical benefits.

12 Reasons to Practice Mindfulness 

12 reasons to practice mindfulness

This is the second in a series of three posts devoted to the topic of mindfulness. Read part I here.

In my last post, I defined the concept of mindfulness. In short, mindfulness is the nonjudgmental acceptance of experiences in the present moment. The practice of mindfulness has gained a lot of attention, and research has found that mindfulness leads to a plethora of benefits. Below is a list of many of these benefits along with links to find out more about each.

What’s the Big Deal About Mindfulness?

what is mindfulness?This will be the first in a series of three posts devoted to the topic of mindfulness.

Mindfulness is a word that gets thrown around a lot in our society. But in spite of the growing attention given to mindfulness, many of us are still left wondering what this word exactly means. If we were asked to define it, many of us would be stumped.

How Mental Health Needs Vary for Teachers and Students

14185524780_fd4d0c9fb9_b

This week, in conjunction with the launch of the Change Direction campaign for mental health awareness, TeacherPop’s wellbeing expert, Janna Miller, is addressing mental health in our schools. Today’s final post, part V in the series, considers the different mental health needs and means of expression for students and teachers. Read part Ipart II, part III, and part IV. And please keep the conversation going by making a pledge to know the signs of suffering and share your commitment using the hashtag #ChangeMentalHealth.

Six Tips for Finding a Mental Health Professional

14417750163_0a0bedcee1_b

This week, in conjunction with the launch of the Change Direction campaign for mental health awareness, TeacherPop’s wellbeing expert, Janna Miller, is addressing mental health in our schools. Today’s post, part IV in the series, outlines six tips for finding a mental health professional. Read part Ipart II, and part III.

In my last post, I discussed the five signs of suffering, or signals that someone you know might be struggling with a mental health concern. Either way, these signs can be an important indication that you or someone in your life could benefit from the help of a mental health professional. Unfortunately, finding a mental health professional can be a difficult process if you aren’t sure what to look for. Below are six tips to help you navigate this process either for yourself or someone else.

Five Signs of Suffering

14363815694_fcbc234525_bThis week, in conjunction with the launch of the Change Direction campaign for mental health awareness, TeacherPop’s wellbeing expert, Janna Miller, is addressing mental health in our schools. Today’s post, part III in the series, discusses the five signs of suffering, how to recognize if someone is experiencing emotional pain, and what you can do to help. Read part I and part II here.