How to Analyze a Poem in 6 Steps

How to analyze a poem in 6 steps

Happy last week of National Poetry Month! We’re kicking things off this Monday with a few tips for helping your students unpack all that poetry has to offer. Check out these six ways to analyze a poem.

Step One: Read

Have your students read the poem once to themselves and then aloud, all the way through, at LEAST twice. Feel free to play a recording of the poem or show a video of someone reading the poem, too.

By |April 25th, 2016|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on How to Analyze a Poem in 6 Steps|

6 Ways to Celebrate Poem in Your Pocket Day

Poem in Your Pocket Day

As your students’ pockets are lined with their favorite poems in honor of Poem in Your Pocket Day, you may be wondering how to put these pocket poems to good use. Here are six creative ways to celebrate this special day that will guarantee National Poetry Month becomes your students’ favorite month of the year.

  1. Organize a “Poems for Pockets” giveaway
By |April 21st, 2016|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on 6 Ways to Celebrate Poem in Your Pocket Day|

4 Easy Poetry Exercises for Your Classroom

4 easy poetry exercises for the classroom

A blank sheet of paper can create a tremendous amount of pressure for even the most seasoned poet. So if your class is having trouble crafting their own poems in honor of National Poetry Month, don’t fret—these easy poetry exercises are sure to get the prose flowing.

1. Mad Libs

Mad libs are a humorous way to engage students and make poetry a little more approachable.  All you have to do is take a famous prose poem and replace each noun and adjective with a blank space. Have your students fill in the spaces with either their own nouns and adjectives, or provide a word bank for them to choose from.

By |April 19th, 2016|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on 4 Easy Poetry Exercises for Your Classroom|

9 Online Poetry Resources for Teachers

9 Online Poetry Resources for Teachers

In celebration of National Poetry Month, here are some of our favorite (free!) online spots where teachers can find what they need to inspire young minds.

Poets.org 

If you’re a primary and secondary teacher looking to bring poems to your classroom, Poets.org is the perfect spot. The site features a great selection of lessons plans that align with Common Core State Standards.

What’s to Love

Teach This Poem: A series featuring a poem a week from their famous online poetry collection, accompanied by interdisciplinary resources and activities designed to help K-12.

By |April 14th, 2016|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on 9 Online Poetry Resources for Teachers|

How Many Ways Can You Celebrate National Poetry Month?

Celebrate National Poetry Month this April!

There’s a number of ways you can kick off the celebration.

But why not start with a standing ovation?

For poetry should make us take pause,

To stand up and offer it a round of applause.  

This April, join TeacherPop in celebrating the 20th anniversary of National Poetry Month! By celebrating the importance of poetry and the vital role it plays in our culture, your students will be inspired to make poetry a part of their lives, not just for the month of April, but every day of the year.

By |March 31st, 2016|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on How Many Ways Can You Celebrate National Poetry Month?|

April Is National Poetry Month! 30 Days of Poetry Starters for Every Classroom

CBhKdsDWAAAMyQUApril is National Poetry Month, and no matter what you teach,  you can transform the first five minutes of every class into an empowering, issues-packed, discussion-based, poetry-friendly space.

In 30 Days of Poet Warriors: Young, Diverse Students, Writing for Change, I have compiled 30 poems and 16 videos by first-time poets and students that address race, immigration, moms, Michael Brown, and more.

Download the booklet for free on the Poet Warriors homepage, and this April, simply start each class by reading (or watching) the daily poem. After reading, follow with four minutes of discussion or writing.

By |March 31st, 2015|General Pop, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on April Is National Poetry Month! 30 Days of Poetry Starters for Every Classroom|

4 Reasons Why Poetry Should Be Celebrated All Year

Image from "To This Day," one of the poems featured in "4 Poems for Making Your Students Love Poetry."

Image from “To This Day,” one of the poems featured in “4 Poems for Making Your Students Love Poetry.”

April was National Poetry Month, and TeacherPop celebrated weekly by featuring four poetry selections from teachers who have participated in Teach For America’s Poet Warriors Project. Here, Emily Southerton, the founder of the Poet Warriors Project, looks back on the four successes that defined the month and offers insight on ways that teachers can encourage students to continue to speak—and be heard.

1) Our students spoke out, and broke the silence. As teachers, we get to hear and learn from our students daily—but within the national dialogue, we recognize the fact that our students’ voices go largely unheard. This National Poetry Month, our students spoke out against the silence, fought to be heard, and claimed their place in a larger movement:

[This place is] dark and it’s lonesome and it’s not at all where
I want to be,
But most of all,
Most of all it’s silent
It’s hushed down to a nearly inaudible whisper,
Just waiting for that door to burst open and let light come in…

But I’ll take a chance.

With one heart-wrenching throwback of this closet,
I’ll say the words I’ve been meaning to say
My whole life.

Christine Vela, 14-year-old Poet Warrior, Denver, CO
Excerpt from “Breaking the Silence”

By |May 8th, 2014|Personal Perspectives, Teaching Tips|Comments Off on 4 Reasons Why Poetry Should Be Celebrated All Year|

4 Poems for Making Your Students Love Poetry

tothisday

April is National Poetry Month, and TeacherPop is celebrating every Friday by featuring four poetry selections from teachers who have participated in Teach For America’s Poet Warriors Project. Interested in getting your class involved? Email for details!

I teach sixth grade in the Arkansas Delta, and have found these four poems to be game-changers in my students’ attitudes about and admiration for poetry. Enjoy!

1. “Touchscreen,” by Marshall Davis Jones

Though a lot of slam poetry covers themes and ideas I just can’t show my tiny 11-year-olds in class, this poem makes all of us laugh out loud and seriously consider how technology influences our daily lives. It never fails to bring a great conversation about cell phones, and students always have plenty to say about how much body language and tone impact the message of a poem.

By |April 25th, 2014|Your Stories|Comments Off on 4 Poems for Making Your Students Love Poetry|